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Culture / We the People Called Quinnipiac

We the People Called Quinnipiac
by Iron Thunderhorse - Thunder Clan Grand Sachem

On the 24th day neesunchog-youhwe kesuk of April Operamac-kesos in the year 1638 napan-nukuddask nukutpasak sweunchog-swah a Quinnipiac scout utteambattammen discovers a large wooden ship off the coast near Totoket.
What manner of people will it be?
More of the English who are already in the land of the Wompanoag?

Graphic courtesy of The WAMPUM (TUELN Newsletter)
Graphic courtesy of The WAMPUM (TUELN Newsletter)

WTPCQ

ACQTC and the QTC Press are proud to offer a scholarly, yet easy to read, history of the Quinnipiac people from the age of glaciers and mammoths to today. Written by our Grand Sachem Iron Thunderhorse, this work documents the truth and sets the record straight about the Quinnipiac. In addition to over 80 pages of text, this ebook includes more than 60 pages of maps, diagrams, illustrations, and photographs.

Information about the history, lore, and language of the Quinnipiac Nation (known as the ‘Quiripey’), the dominant nation in the 1500s of Quinnehtukqut, has been sporadic and written by outsiders unfamiliar with the Algonquian language and culture. All these works, written a century or more ago, are plagued with errors, misconceptions, prejudices and stereotypes, leaving the modern reader with little source for finding answers about the Quinnipiac.

Iron Thunderhorse has written hundreds of articles and newspaper columns over the past twenty-two years, including a 100 column series on Quinnipiac language, lore, and history for The Branford Review. Iron was recently nominated by several New England scholars for the American Medal of Honor for his unparalleled lifelong work and research. Still, his style is readable and has a multidisciplinary presentation that is rarely equaled.

The ebook is published in PDF format on CD-ROM, and comes in a space-saving thin jewel case. The cost of the CD is $30 (shipping and handling included).

Visit our Trading Post for more information.


On this and these following pages we provide excerpts from the ebook, We The People Called Quinnipiac:

Also Available on ACQTC.org

There are several news items, reprints, and original articles on ACQTC.org which deal, at least in part, with the history and culture of the Quinnipiac and related Native American peoples:

MAR 2007: Setting the Record Straight

Other than QTC Press Publications (produced by ACQTC, Inc.), there exist only two (2) publications and a dozen or so articles giving details about the Quinnipiac Tribal Nation. The two initial publications have several things in common. They were both published over a century ago, and both were based on information that has been refuted or rejected by contemporary scholars as well as traditionalist culture-bearers of the region.

In this latest article written by Iron Thunderhorse, the intent is to set the record straight about the history and nature of the peoples known by Europeans as Quinnipiac, and even about the goals and methods of ACQTC, Inc.

Read the full article: Setting the Record Straight
See also: Quinnipiac Factual Milestones


We the People Called Quinnipiac

Forward
Ruth Thunderhorse

We The People Called Quinnipiac is the first and only history of the Quinnipiac Nation of Connecticut written by a scholar, linguist, and historian who is himself a member of that nation.

For those who never heard of the Quinnipiac, for those who have searched diligently, trying in vain to find information about these people, and for those who just want to know more, this book is for you. With the voice of one who knows from the inside out, the author introduces the reader to a beautiful people whom he loves, delving into their ways of living, their prophecies, their stories, their calendars, their celebrations, and their beliefs, as well as presenting an overview of this people’s ten-thousand-year history which, miraculously, still continues today.

With a depth of understanding and a breadth of research, Iron Thunderhorse introduces the reader to his own unforgettable people, the Quinnipiac. With clarity and focus, he takes the reader back in time to the days when gigantic glaciers were beginning to melt and gargantuan beavers, sloths, mastodons, and mammoths roamed freely. Through extensive knowledge of the Algonquian languages and research into the verbal and written histories preserved by Native and European historians; as well as archaeological reports, the author links his ancestors to both the Red Paint Maritime peoples and the Adena-Hopewell.

Early European traders were impressed by the huge dug-out canoes which traveled Long Island Sound; carrying up to 80 indigenous people, and, apparently, the Puritans were moved to envy by the beautiful, grand Quinnipiac plantations, since the author tells how his people’s beloved homeland was lost to those newcomers and how his people suffered through a long Trail of Heartaches which the history books forgot to remember.

The author deals brilliantly with the stereotypes and misinformation that tends to permeate the American public’s perception of the indigenous peoples of this continent, and puts to rest the misconceptions of “how Indians look.” With gentleness he explodes that 400-year-old ethnocentric, lingering myth that “Indians” were illiterate, ignorant, barbarian savages. On the contrary, he shows that they were literate theologians, astronomers, prophets, historians, philosophers, environmentalists, agriculturalists, and seafarers. But, more than that, they were people of great spiritual power.

We The People Called Quinnipiac is a book of firsts. Not for over 100 years has there been any book written about the Quinnipiac Nation of Connecticut. Never before has there ever been a history of the Quinnipiac, written in English, by a Quinnipiac. This is a history of the first people ever to be forced onto a reservation. In addition, so far as I know, this is the first attempt to define a Native American Nation of North America in such an intimate and comprehensive way.

We The People Called Quinnipiac is a poignant story of a people who faced many kinds of giants and endured various types of hostile environments, yet miraculously survived, with their spirit and their integrity of character still intact. Each fascinating chapter is a splendid tribute to a great nation whose people are an inspiration to us all. This book belongs in every home and school library and on the required reading list of every American History department. You donít want to miss reading this treasure.

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